For us at Provisions, the surest sign of the start of summer is the New York Good Food Mercantile, an expo of mostly local food products that are as delicious as they are ethical; the Good Food movement is about prioritizing the stories behind our food. We’re proud to feature many of these producers in our store because we know that transparency in food production is important not only for our guests to make informed decisions, but for creating a more viable food system overall.

This weekend our buyers will head to the Good Food Mercantile in Greenpoint where we’ll be sourcing new products for our shelves and showing our support to many of our current local food producers, Raaka Chocolate, Crown Finnish Caves, Charlito’s Cocina, and Matzo Project to name a few!

As a proud founding member of the Good Food Collaborative, we are on a mission to build commerce and community between the people who make, purvey, and enjoy Good Food. 
Angela Gelso
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Eat Your Vegetables, Fort Greene!

By Produce Buyer, Nailah Griffin
Culturally, my gastronomic upbringing was in Caribbean and Southern fare, both of which can be very meat-centric cuisines. However, when I was about 10 years old, my mom decided to become a veggie-focused pescatrian, totally shifting the eating habits of our household. As a result, we learned newer, better ways to eat our favorite dishes sans meat. In honor of “Eat Your Vegetables” Day, and parents everywhere struggling to get their kids to eat veggies, I present a few of my childhood favorites!


Red Cabbage Coleslaw with Green Apples
1 ½ cup of shredded purple cabbage
1 large crisp green apple, thinly sliced
1 medium carrot, grated
½ medium red onion, diced
¼ cup mayo
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
½ lemon
2 tsp honey
Salt/Pepper to taste

In a bowl, mix mayo, apple cider vinegar, honey, salt and pepper, and squeeze the lemon halve. Whisk until smooth. In another bowl, combine all the cabbage, apple, carrot, and onion. Pour sauce over the veggies and toss until evenly coated. Enjoy.


Bajan Style Rice
2 cups rice
6 cups water
1 vegetable bouillon cube
1 tbsp thyme
1 tbsp marjoram
1 tbsp chive, dried or freshly chopped
1 large tomato, diced
1 medium onion (or ½ large onion), diced

Boil the vegetable bouillon, diced onion, herbs, in 4 cups of water for about 15-20 minutes.
Then, add the rice, diced tomatoes and remaining water. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook until the water is absorbed and the rice is tender


5 Spice Tofu Stir Fry
1 package firm tofu, cubed
2 heads of broccoli, chopped
½ red pepper, diced
½ green pepper, diced
½ cup yellow onion, diced
2 cups of spinach
1 medium sized zucchini, diced
5 spice blend
Olive Oil, as desired

In a bowl, season diced firm tofu with 5 spice blend and set aside. In a skillet, heat about 2 tbsp of oil and, once hot, add the onions and peppers. Cook until onions are translucent, then add broccoli and cook for about 7 minutes. Next, stir in the zucchini and the tofu. Cook until all vegetables are bright but haven’t lost their crunch and then add in spinach. Lower the heat and cover the skillet, allowing it to sit for about 2-3 minutes. Remove top and stir until spinach is evenly dispersed.

Angela GelsoEat Your Vegetables, Fort Greene!
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Spread Shrub, It’s The Brooklyn Way

What’s shrub got to do with it? Shrub is not a bush, but a refreshing mixer perfect for summer beverages. Popular during America’s colonial era, shrubs were a means of preserving fruit flavors prior to the invention of refrigeration and industrially processed foods. But like many traditional recipes, shrubs are now making a comeback! Also known as drinking vinegar, shrubs are an acidulated syrup made from fruits, vinegar, and sugar. A versatile concentrate for cocktails and softdrinks, try a lime shrub with tequila for an easy margarita, or dilute a strawberry shrub with seltzer for a funky soda similar to kombucha.

We’re excited to showcase two shrubs this summer, both made near Washington DC. Shrub District infuses vinegar and simple syrup with locally grown fruits and herbs, and is sold as a concentrate. It can be combined with seltzer to taste, with or without your favorite spirit, and each bottle comes with unique recipes on the label. For shrubs on the fly, check out Element Shrub‘s newest line Shrub & Club. Though Element makes lovely syrups, this ingenious ready-to-drink shrub is pre-balanced with club soda right in the bottle. Delicious chilled straight or poured over ice with your favorite spirit!

If you feel like getting creative, both Shrub District and Element have even more fun recipes listed on their websites. Whether you enjoy a buzz or prefer a clear head on a hot day, shrubs are a refreshing, bright way to celebrate the best of Summer’s bounty!

Angela GelsoSpread Shrub, It’s The Brooklyn Way
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We Like To Party

Have you ever gazed longingly at the Provisions cheese case and wished the delectable dairy within could star at your next book club meeting? Ever peered hungrily at the sandwiches stacked in the deli case and thought how good they’d taste at your coming office lunch? If you have, you’re in luck! We are proud to offer our catering services for any type of event you can dream up. Our chefs, cheesemongers, and bakers lovingly prepare and plate all the food for you, using the same fresh, top quality ingredients we pride ourselves in stocking at the store. We’ll even deliver the food and drinks right to you.

Here at The Greene Grape, we don’t just want to put groceries in your fridge and wine in your glass. We want our food to make your next social gathering spectacular and your corporate events something to look forward to. From artfully plated cheese and charcuterie to customized sweet treats to fresh and colorful salads, we’ve got it all. We’ve also got a spiffy online menu which we think really simplifies the ordering process.

Let us help you make your next party a smash hit, and don’t worry, we promise not to crash.

Meg ChristmanWe Like To Party
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Pro Tips From Our Produce Team Pt. 2

Provisions Produce Buyer Nailah Griffin is no stranger to over-ripened and underused produce. To make the most of the fruits and veggies that come home from the market, Nailah has prepared some tips and tricks that go beyond snacks and traditional uses. You’ll be wasting less and re-purposing more in no time!

Part 2: Berries
Dandruff Fighter:
This one is great for those overripe strawberries you forgot about in the fridge! Mash 2 ripe strawberries and mix with 1 tbsp of coconut oil and 1 tbsp of honey. Apply the mixture to your scalp and let sit for 20 minutes before rinsing with cool water. This recipe also helps with fungal growth on the scalp due to the inhibiting properties of the magnesium, copper, and other organic compounds found in strawberries.

Compound Butter: This recipe can work for any overripe berries. Simply take 2 sticks of softened butter and add mashed overripe berries, blending until evenly distributed. In no time flat, you have a spread! Store in the fridge, or place on parchment paper, shape into a log, and freeze for later use.

Meg ChristmanPro Tips From Our Produce Team Pt. 2
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Pro Tips from our Produce Team

Provisions Produce Buyer Nailah Griffin is no stranger to over-ripened and underused produce. To make the most of the fruits and veggies that come home from the market, Nailah has prepared some tips and tricks that go beyond snacks and traditional uses. You’ll be wasting less and repurposing more in no time!

Citrus Peels

    1. Oven Cleaner:

For this tried and true cleaning tip you can use any type of citrus peel. Place leftover peels in a jar and cover with white vinegar, making sure peels are covered to prevent rotting. Let sit in the covered jar for 5 days to 2 weeks. Transfer to spray bottle, apply to oven and scrub. For more stuck on stains, add a few spoonfuls of baking soda!

    1. Lemon Pepper Seasoning:

Lemons offer a bright burst of flavor, but you can also use any citrus peel of your preference. This recipe is flexible depending on the number of peels you have around to use. Use a ratio of one grated peel to one tbsp ground pepper. Mix together and spread onto a lined cookie sheet. Place the sheet  in the oven at 200 degrees. Check periodically, giving a toss here and there until completely dried (about an hour). To achieve a fine grind, place peels in a spice blender, or use a mortar and pestle for a more coarse blend. Next, season with one tbsp of salt per peel. Mix and enjoy. Stored in a mason jar with a tight lid, this keeps well for about a month in the cabinet.

    1. Deodorant:

For a natural alternative, just rub the lemon pulp under your arms! The acid in lemon eats at the bacteria that causes odor.

Meg ChristmanPro Tips from our Produce Team
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Chicken Feet for the Soul

If you’ve ever stopped by our Whole Animal Butchery counter you may have noticed various animal heads, soap and candles made out of fat, and even jerky specifically for the canine in your life. If it’s not clear by now, we don’t like to let any part of the animal go to waste. In other words, the beauty of a by-product is in the eye of the beholder. Which brings us to chicken feet – the superfood you won’t likely see on the cover of any magazines.

If you have heard of any of the health benefits of bone broth, then you might easily understand why chicken feet are a secret weapon. Unlike other animal bones, chicken feet contain joints and are comprised of tendons and cartilage as well as bone. Chicken feet are chock full of collagen and trace minerals which are readily available to the body when cooked down in a stock. Take home a few and add them to your next pot of stock for an added golden color, rich texture, and of course substantial health benefit.

And if soups and stocks aren’t your thing, Provision’s butcher Demecia gave us a tip from her grandma – roast them in the oven and suck the collagen off yourself! (And for the truly curious, but totally uninspired chef – maybe just head to Chinatown for dim sum and order the Phoenix claws.)

Some of our favorite resources for chicken feet broth:
Nourished Kitchen
Real Food RN

Meg ChristmanChicken Feet for the Soul
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Greatest Of All Time

In celebration of our month-long goat special at the Butcher’s counter, we’ve put together a seasonally inspired recipe comprised of ingredients that can all be found in our shop!

Braised Goat with Sunchoke Mashed Potatoes
This recipe serves up to 4 people

Braised Goat Ingredients:
2 lbs. of goat for braising (speak to your butcher for recommendations), allow to come to room temperature
Mire poix (2 large carrots, 1 large onion, 1 celery stalk)
1 bay leaf
5 large garlic cloves – smashed
1 sprig of rosemary
1 qt of GG housemade chicken stock
Salt & pepper – enough to liberally season the full cut of meat (5-10 minutes before cookin
Fresh parsley – optional for garnish

Instructions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 325°F.
  2. Heat a cast iron skillet, roasting pan or dutch oven until it is smoking hot on the stove top.
  3. Add 3 tablespoons of high heat oil of your choice (e.g. grapeseed oil or coconut oil).
  4. Brown the meat (already seasoned with salt and pepper).  Once you have a rich dark brown crust, remove and place to the side.
  5. Add the mire poix and rosemary, allow to sweat (approximately 8-10 minutes), stirring occasionally.
  6. Pour in chicken stock, allowing it to deglaze and reduce by one third.
  7. Nestle the meat into the braising liquid and cover (if you’re using a roasting pan or skillet, seal tightly with aluminum foil)
  8. Transfer into the oven.
  9. After 2 hours check for tenderness– should be fork tender. If not return to the oven and check periodically.
  10. Once tender, remove the meat and shred using two forks to pull apart the meat.
  11. Puree the braising liquid and veggies, using an immersion blender, or transferring to a food processor.
  12. Mix together the braised meat and pureed vegetables and place in a serving dish of your choice.
Sunchoke Mashed Potatoes Ingredients:

Salt, as needed
1 1/4 lbs sunchokes
1/2 lb Yukon Gold potatoes, cut into 2-inch chunks
1 Tbsp butter
Pepper, as needed

Instructions:

  1. Fill a large saucepan with salted water.
  2. Peel the sunchokes, then cut them into 1-in pieces. As you work, place the peeled sunchokes into the water to prevent browning.
  3. Add the potatoes to the saucepan and bring the mixture to a rolling boil.
  4. Reduce the heat to medium, and allow the sunchokes and potatoes to cook together until fork-tender, about 12 minutes.
  5. Remove the mixture from the heat and drain thoroughly. Transfer the vegetables to a food processor. Add the butter, then puree the mixture until smooth and free of lumps. (This can also be done by hand with a potato masher).
  6. Taste and season with salt and pepper, as desired. Hold warm or gently reheat before serving.

This dish pairs well with a sauteed green such as fresh spigarello and NY Shuk Harissa with preserved lemon!

Angela GelsoGreatest Of All Time
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Citrus Circle of Trust

Come January, gone are the days of fresh picked apples. Locally grown berries and ripe stone fruit? A mere memory. Thankfully, citrus is in season, and one bite of these juicy, sweet fruits is a momentary escape to some far off grove. Read on and decide which is bite of Provisions produce is right for you!

Sweet: Cara Cara, Heritage Navel, and Blood Oranges, Pomelo (grapefruit’s less tart cousin)
Juicy: Page or Satsuma Mandarin
Extra Juicy: Sumo Mandarin – Nailah, our Produce Buyer’s top pick!
Tart: Oro Blanco and Ruby Red Grapefruit
Unique: Meyer Lemon (sweet and tart!)
Buddha’s Hand – This citrus has no pulp or flesh, but the rind gives off a heavenly citrus and lavender aroma. Add it to a cocktail, prepare in a marmalade, candy it or swap it for lemon in dressings or in batters!

Meg ChristmanCitrus Circle of Trust
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How To Roast a Boston Butt

We checked in with our Head Butcher, Lena Diaz to see how she would go about roasting one of her favorite cuts – the Pork Butt a.k.a. Boston Butt. Her biggest tip is to allow the meat to roast slowly. With a recipe this simple, you don’t have to make a day of it, but you will enjoy the aromas from the morning until the time you finally get to dig in at night!

Ingredients:
One 8-10lb pork butt
Handful of toasted coriander seeds
Handful of toasted fennel seeds
4 cloves fresh garlic, pressed in a morter & pestle, or chopped finely
Ground Cinnamon
Garlic
Salt a generous amount, this is a large cut of meat after all!

Alternately- If you’d rather get more creative you can also just clean out your spice rack. Make sure to toast any whole spices to make the most out of their aromatic qualities and of course use plenty of salt to rub!

Directions:
The Night Before

1. Season your Roast
Rub the pork butt liberally with the toasted seeds, garlic, and salt. Add a dash of cinnamon all over the butt. Place the cut in a casserole dish and leave overnight.

Roasting Day
2. Remove roast from refrigerator and let it rest until it reaches room temp.
3. Preheat your oven to 250 degrees, about 15 minutes.
4. When both the oven and the roast are ready, place the casserole dish in the oven, uncovered.
5. Roast for approximately 8 hours, checking for tenderness periodically.
6. When the roast is fork tender you may remove it from the oven.
7. (Optional) If the roast needs a little extra color on the exterior, you can raise the oven temp to 450 degrees and let it roast for up to an additional 15 minutes.

Let it stand for a few minutes and then enjoy alongside roast vegetables and a glass of wine!

*Photo by Alberto Vargas 

Meg ChristmanHow To Roast a Boston Butt
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