Farmtotable

Eat Your Vegetables, Fort Greene!

By Produce Buyer, Nailah Griffin
Culturally, my gastronomic upbringing was in Caribbean and Southern fare, both of which can be very meat-centric cuisines. However, when I was about 10 years old, my mom decided to become a veggie-focused pescatrian, totally shifting the eating habits of our household. As a result, we learned newer, better ways to eat our favorite dishes sans meat. In honor of “Eat Your Vegetables” Day, and parents everywhere struggling to get their kids to eat veggies, I present a few of my childhood favorites!


Red Cabbage Coleslaw with Green Apples
1 ½ cup of shredded purple cabbage
1 large crisp green apple, thinly sliced
1 medium carrot, grated
½ medium red onion, diced
¼ cup mayo
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
½ lemon
2 tsp honey
Salt/Pepper to taste

In a bowl, mix mayo, apple cider vinegar, honey, salt and pepper, and squeeze the lemon halve. Whisk until smooth. In another bowl, combine all the cabbage, apple, carrot, and onion. Pour sauce over the veggies and toss until evenly coated. Enjoy.


Bajan Style Rice
2 cups rice
6 cups water
1 vegetable bouillon cube
1 tbsp thyme
1 tbsp marjoram
1 tbsp chive, dried or freshly chopped
1 large tomato, diced
1 medium onion (or ½ large onion), diced

Boil the vegetable bouillon, diced onion, herbs, in 4 cups of water for about 15-20 minutes.
Then, add the rice, diced tomatoes and remaining water. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook until the water is absorbed and the rice is tender


5 Spice Tofu Stir Fry
1 package firm tofu, cubed
2 heads of broccoli, chopped
½ red pepper, diced
½ green pepper, diced
½ cup yellow onion, diced
2 cups of spinach
1 medium sized zucchini, diced
5 spice blend
Olive Oil, as desired

In a bowl, season diced firm tofu with 5 spice blend and set aside. In a skillet, heat about 2 tbsp of oil and, once hot, add the onions and peppers. Cook until onions are translucent, then add broccoli and cook for about 7 minutes. Next, stir in the zucchini and the tofu. Cook until all vegetables are bright but haven’t lost their crunch and then add in spinach. Lower the heat and cover the skillet, allowing it to sit for about 2-3 minutes. Remove top and stir until spinach is evenly dispersed.

Angela GelsoEat Your Vegetables, Fort Greene!
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Sofrito for the Season

Mixtures of stewed aromatic vegetables, herbs and spices are at the core of almost every type of cuisine. Sofrito is the Spanish version, usually consisting of peppers, onions and tomato. Luckily all of those veggies are in season right now and Provisions Produce Buyer, Jason Rivera, has put together a recipe for sofrito success. The idea behind this homestyle dish is to use whatever vegetables are available to create a flavorful, easy to eat, easy to digest meal.

(And remember, the word sofrito doesn’t have to limit your cooking. In the Fall you could just as easily be using fennel, carrots and onions instead of peppers, onions and tomatoes.)

Ingredients
Extra virgin olive oil (preferably really tasty stuff)
A few sweet peppers, diced (whatever looks pretty at the market)
A fat juicy onion, diced (look for fresh uncured onions at this time of year)
A ripe tomato diced (Brandywines work really well for this, I recommend a red tomato)
1 bay leaf
1 1/2 cups white wine
water or chicken stock
1/2 pound of green, yellow, purple or romano beans with the tough end trimmed
2 heirloom squash cut into 1/4 inch rounds (my favorite is the Romanesca)
1 ear corn cut from the cob
4 red radishes sliced into 1/4 inch rounds
10 fresh basil leaves
Salt and pepper to taste
Sherry vinegar to taste

1. Heat a pot, large enough to contain all of the ingredients. Add enough olive oil to generously coat the bottom of the pot. Throw the peppers and onions in there and cook them until they are soft without browning them. If it looks a little dry add more olive oil.
2. Add the tomatoes, bay leaf and white wine. Simmer this until all of the liquid evaporates.
3. At this point continue to cook the mixture until the oil separates out and the mixture starts to stick on the bottom. Be careful here, you don’t want burnt, just a little toasted. Stir very often.
4. Add the beans and cover with stock or water and simmer. It’s a good idea to take a wooden spoon and scrape all the tasty bits of the bottom of the pot.
5. Cook the beans until they are very soft and tender, and a lot of the liquid has evaporated. They will turn army green, and look overcooked, but they will also become sweet and soak up all of that sofrito liquid.
6. Stir in the squash, corn and radishes and remove from heat. At this point season with salt, pepper and vinegar.
7. This dish should be served just above room temperature with a piece of crusty bread to soak up the juices. Just before serving, stir in the basil leaves and a bit of fresh olive oil.

Enjoy!

Meg ChristmanSofrito for the Season
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The Mighty Burger

The Mighty Burger

The most quintessential item at any Fourth of July cookout, the burger is as classic as it gets, but not all burgers are made the same! Our whole animal butchers grind specific cuts of beef to create our All-Star line-up of burgers. Let us introduce you to the team!

Ribeye Cap: lean and satisfying
pair with: Wisconsin Sheep Dairy Co-op’s Blue Hills Bleu

Short Rib: extra juicy
pair with: Jasper Hills Clothbound Cheddar

La Ranchera: skirt steak burger with extra beefy flavor
pair with:a juicy pickle

Bacon Brisket: our most popular burger
enhance with:a sweet alpine cheese for extra melt factor!

Extra-Dry Aged Ribeye Cap: tender with highly concentrated flavor
pair with:
nothing

Meg ChristmanThe Mighty Burger
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Grill’s Night Out!

Can’t decide what to grill this weekend? Take a tip from our butchers! It doesn’t take much to bring out the incredible flavor of our grass-fed meats.
Beef: Dry Aged Rib-eye, Top Sirloin or NY Strip
Pork: Top Sirloin, T-Bone Chop
Sausage: Any kind!!
Pro-Tip: Use fresh soaked bundles of herbs in place of a basting brush, the slight abrasions they create increase the surface area for browning and impart light flavors throughout the meat.

Don’t forget the wine! While you’re grilling, open up a bottle of Chad Pinot Noir ’13 ($20), a tasty Cali pinot packed with lush, tart red fruits with underpinnings of fresh, mulchy earth.

Sourced from the Santa Rita Hills in Santa Barbara County, the wine is medium-bodied, versatile, and intense in flavor, allowing it to hold its own with whatever you’re throwing on the grill.

Happy grillin’ Fort Greene!

Greene GrapeGrill’s Night Out!
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Celebrate Earth Day the Brooklyn Way

Join us as we work to build a Greener Grape!

We’re kicking it off this Saturday at Habana Works’ Annual Earth Day Expo!
We’ll be stationed at this celebration of urban environmentalism at Habana Outpost between 11am-2pm.

Learn from our agriculture expert, Mickey Davis, what it means to be a sustainable farm. To help explain some complex ideas, we’ll have a host of coloring pages (for kids and adults alike) that break it all down. We’re also calling all crafty foodies to join us at our “Ugly Produce Decoration Station.” Afterwards, come by our shop and explore all of the Sustainability Do’s and Dont’s that we practice every day!

Then come in on Earth Day – Wednesday, April 22nd – as we give back to the neighborhood and promote earthy friendly shopping habits with a free re-usable bag give-a-way all day!

We’d like to give many thanks to our community here in Fort Greene- we’re working hard to help create a greener future and we couldn’t do it without all of you.

Greene GrapeCelebrate Earth Day the Brooklyn Way
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Supporting Local Farms… from Afar!

With Earth Day around the corner, we have been taking stock of our environmental impact. The most basic way to make sure our carbon footprint stays low is to support local farms businesses whenever possible. But in order to provide pantry staples year round, we sometimes need to go outside of that 250 mile radius. Let’s look at two staples, rice and beans, and consider how companies we source from can keep us committed to supporting small and sustainable farms!

 

We carry many varieties of Rancho Gordo beans. While they travel from California to get to us, the company’s commitment to growing heirloom beans and working with local growers is without comparison.

Heirloom varieties are important for preserving genetic diversity and they also remind us that our food doesn’t have to look uniform! The Rancho Gordo-Xoxoc Project creates a market for small farms in Mexico to grow heirloom beans indigenous to their areas. These beans also taste amazing! You’ll find a creaminess and earthiness in each bag that is impossible to replicate out of a can.

 

Lotus Foods brings us rice from afar in order to support small and family farms in areas of the world where rice as a commodity crop leads to overproduction and damages local environments and economies.

By providing market incentives for small sustainable farms in these regions, Lotus Foods creates a system that encourages environmentally friendly growing practices. The heirloom varieties of rice that we carry come from Indonesia and China. Volcano Rice has a dark color that reflects the high concentration of minerals such as magnesium and zinc, found in the volcanic soils where it grows. Forbidden Rice comes from a farm that uses a System of Rice Intensification that reduces water use while boosting production.

 

So try out an heirloom bean or two, marvel at their colorful complexity, enjoy a bowl of Volcanic Rice and stay tuned for more info on our sustainable buying practices. It’s not always easy being green, but we’re getting there one bite at a time!

 

Read more about Rancho Gordo here

Read more about Lotus Foods here 

Greene GrapeSupporting Local Farms… from Afar!
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