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More Than A-peeling: Locally Harvested Apples

A walk through our produce section makes two things clear: fall is here, and so are apples! In addition to classics like Gala and McIntosh, we have many varieties you might not see in a typical grocery store. Our Produce Department works directly with ecologically-minded local farms like Champlain Orchards and Scott Farms in Vermont, and Lancaster Farm Fresh Cooperative in Pennsylvania. These farms grow a variety of apple species that support the local ecology by promoting biodiversity. While we recommend trying them all out, we thought we’d provide a little context to inform your choices in cooking and snacking.

Applications for Apples

If you’re looking for the perfect baking apples, we have a number of great options. Yellow with a pink blush, Honeycrisp apples live up to their title in both texture and sweetness. They work well baked into pies, crumbles, and other desserts. Their crisp texture also makes them ideal raw in salads and coleslaw.

For a great raw apple snack, the gala apple really shines. One of the sweetest apples, Galas pack some of the best nutritional value, containing vitamins A, C, and B in and pectin. Eat them raw or add them diced up to salads, salsas, and chutneys. Similar to Galas, we also carry the Sansa apple. Sansas are a Japanese species that are complexly sweet and mildly tart. They contain important nutrients like potassium and dietary fiber, and are a perfect snacking apple eaten fresh and raw.

Juicy and lightly tart, Paula Reds are a dusty red apple with gold spots. They break down quickly and easily, and are ideal for applesauce and apple butter. Similarly, McIntosh apples have a delicate flesh and spicy flavor that makes them ideal for cider and applesauce.

Mike FunkMore Than A-peeling: Locally Harvested Apples
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Raising The Bar! – Granola Bar Recipe

The trouble with tasty snacks is they’re just as often unhealthy as they are tedious to make. Scoops & Sweets granola bars are neither, and we’re going to give you the goods on how you can make these power snacks at home. Executive Pastry Chef Caroline Schiff is our resident expert not only for her baking prowess but also for her status as a marathon-running athlete. Her nutty seeded granola bars are packed with protein and contain no refined sugars or dairy, and will keep for up to ten days stored in an airtight container. Bring them along for long bike rides, hiking, camping, or for a quick power-up for your busy schedule!

– And if you don’t have time for baking, we’ll do it for you! Stop by Scoops & Sweets at 680 Fulton St. to pick up some of these seeded homemade granola bars!

Ingredients:
• 3 large egg whites -2 ½ cups rolled oats, non-instant, gluten free certified if you prefer
• 1 cup white sesame seeds, toasted -¾ cup golden raisins, packed in -¾ cup creamy peanut butter -½ cup dark maple syrup, B Grade if possible -2 tablespoons          ground flaxseed or whole chia seeds -½ cup honey
• 1 teaspoon kosher salt -½ cup dried cranberries, dried cherries or dried blueberries, or use a mixture (try to use ones without any added sugars)!
• 1 cup of toasted nuts of your choice, raw pumpkin seeds or sunflower seeds, or use a mixture!

Instructions:
Preheat your oven to 315 degrees
1. Lightly oil (you can use cooking spray or a thin coat of olive or canola oil) a 9”x9” square baking dish, and line with a square of parchment paper
2. In a mixing bowl, combine all your ingredients and mix thoroughly
3. Press the mixture into the baking dish in an even, packed layer
4. Bake at 315 degrees for about 20 minutes, until lightly golden
5. Let cool fully
6. Turn the bar out onto a cutting board and cut into squares of your desired size
7. Wrap each square individually in saran wrap or ziplock bags

Angela GelsoRaising The Bar! – Granola Bar Recipe
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We Like To Party

Have you ever gazed longingly at the Provisions cheese case and wished the delectable dairy within could star at your next book club meeting? Ever peered hungrily at the sandwiches stacked in the deli case and thought how good they’d taste at your coming office lunch? If you have, you’re in luck! We are proud to offer our catering services for any type of event you can dream up. Our chefs, cheesemongers, and bakers lovingly prepare and plate all the food for you, using the same fresh, top quality ingredients we pride ourselves in stocking at the store. We’ll even deliver the food and drinks right to you.

Here at The Greene Grape, we don’t just want to put groceries in your fridge and wine in your glass. We want our food to make your next social gathering spectacular and your corporate events something to look forward to. From artfully plated cheese and charcuterie to customized sweet treats to fresh and colorful salads, we’ve got it all. We’ve also got a spiffy online menu which we think really simplifies the ordering process.

Let us help you make your next party a smash hit, and don’t worry, we promise not to crash.

Meg ChristmanWe Like To Party
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Pro Tips From Our Produce Team Pt. 2

Provisions Produce Buyer Nailah Griffin is no stranger to over-ripened and underused produce. To make the most of the fruits and veggies that come home from the market, Nailah has prepared some tips and tricks that go beyond snacks and traditional uses. You’ll be wasting less and re-purposing more in no time!

Part 2: Berries
Dandruff Fighter:
This one is great for those overripe strawberries you forgot about in the fridge! Mash 2 ripe strawberries and mix with 1 tbsp of coconut oil and 1 tbsp of honey. Apply the mixture to your scalp and let sit for 20 minutes before rinsing with cool water. This recipe also helps with fungal growth on the scalp due to the inhibiting properties of the magnesium, copper, and other organic compounds found in strawberries.

Compound Butter: This recipe can work for any overripe berries. Simply take 2 sticks of softened butter and add mashed overripe berries, blending until evenly distributed. In no time flat, you have a spread! Store in the fridge, or place on parchment paper, shape into a log, and freeze for later use.

Meg ChristmanPro Tips From Our Produce Team Pt. 2
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Pro Tips from our Produce Team

Provisions Produce Buyer Nailah Griffin is no stranger to over-ripened and underused produce. To make the most of the fruits and veggies that come home from the market, Nailah has prepared some tips and tricks that go beyond snacks and traditional uses. You’ll be wasting less and repurposing more in no time!

Citrus Peels

    1. Oven Cleaner:

For this tried and true cleaning tip you can use any type of citrus peel. Place leftover peels in a jar and cover with white vinegar, making sure peels are covered to prevent rotting. Let sit in the covered jar for 5 days to 2 weeks. Transfer to spray bottle, apply to oven and scrub. For more stuck on stains, add a few spoonfuls of baking soda!

    1. Lemon Pepper Seasoning:

Lemons offer a bright burst of flavor, but you can also use any citrus peel of your preference. This recipe is flexible depending on the number of peels you have around to use. Use a ratio of one grated peel to one tbsp ground pepper. Mix together and spread onto a lined cookie sheet. Place the sheet  in the oven at 200 degrees. Check periodically, giving a toss here and there until completely dried (about an hour). To achieve a fine grind, place peels in a spice blender, or use a mortar and pestle for a more coarse blend. Next, season with one tbsp of salt per peel. Mix and enjoy. Stored in a mason jar with a tight lid, this keeps well for about a month in the cabinet.

    1. Deodorant:

For a natural alternative, just rub the lemon pulp under your arms! The acid in lemon eats at the bacteria that causes odor.

Meg ChristmanPro Tips from our Produce Team
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Chicken Feet for the Soul

If you’ve ever stopped by our Whole Animal Butchery counter you may have noticed various animal heads, soap and candles made out of fat, and even jerky specifically for the canine in your life. If it’s not clear by now, we don’t like to let any part of the animal go to waste. In other words, the beauty of a by-product is in the eye of the beholder. Which brings us to chicken feet – the superfood you won’t likely see on the cover of any magazines.

If you have heard of any of the health benefits of bone broth, then you might easily understand why chicken feet are a secret weapon. Unlike other animal bones, chicken feet contain joints and are comprised of tendons and cartilage as well as bone. Chicken feet are chock full of collagen and trace minerals which are readily available to the body when cooked down in a stock. Take home a few and add them to your next pot of stock for an added golden color, rich texture, and of course substantial health benefit.

And if soups and stocks aren’t your thing, Provision’s butcher Demecia gave us a tip from her grandma – roast them in the oven and suck the collagen off yourself! (And for the truly curious, but totally uninspired chef – maybe just head to Chinatown for dim sum and order the Phoenix claws.)

Some of our favorite resources for chicken feet broth:
Nourished Kitchen
Real Food RN

Meg ChristmanChicken Feet for the Soul
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Greatest Of All Time

In celebration of our month-long goat special at the Butcher’s counter, we’ve put together a seasonally inspired recipe comprised of ingredients that can all be found in our shop!

Braised Goat with Sunchoke Mashed Potatoes
This recipe serves up to 4 people

Braised Goat Ingredients:
2 lbs. of goat for braising (speak to your butcher for recommendations), allow to come to room temperature
Mire poix (2 large carrots, 1 large onion, 1 celery stalk)
1 bay leaf
5 large garlic cloves – smashed
1 sprig of rosemary
1 qt of GG housemade chicken stock
Salt & pepper – enough to liberally season the full cut of meat (5-10 minutes before cookin
Fresh parsley – optional for garnish

Instructions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 325°F.
  2. Heat a cast iron skillet, roasting pan or dutch oven until it is smoking hot on the stove top.
  3. Add 3 tablespoons of high heat oil of your choice (e.g. grapeseed oil or coconut oil).
  4. Brown the meat (already seasoned with salt and pepper).  Once you have a rich dark brown crust, remove and place to the side.
  5. Add the mire poix and rosemary, allow to sweat (approximately 8-10 minutes), stirring occasionally.
  6. Pour in chicken stock, allowing it to deglaze and reduce by one third.
  7. Nestle the meat into the braising liquid and cover (if you’re using a roasting pan or skillet, seal tightly with aluminum foil)
  8. Transfer into the oven.
  9. After 2 hours check for tenderness– should be fork tender. If not return to the oven and check periodically.
  10. Once tender, remove the meat and shred using two forks to pull apart the meat.
  11. Puree the braising liquid and veggies, using an immersion blender, or transferring to a food processor.
  12. Mix together the braised meat and pureed vegetables and place in a serving dish of your choice.
Sunchoke Mashed Potatoes Ingredients:

Salt, as needed
1 1/4 lbs sunchokes
1/2 lb Yukon Gold potatoes, cut into 2-inch chunks
1 Tbsp butter
Pepper, as needed

Instructions:

  1. Fill a large saucepan with salted water.
  2. Peel the sunchokes, then cut them into 1-in pieces. As you work, place the peeled sunchokes into the water to prevent browning.
  3. Add the potatoes to the saucepan and bring the mixture to a rolling boil.
  4. Reduce the heat to medium, and allow the sunchokes and potatoes to cook together until fork-tender, about 12 minutes.
  5. Remove the mixture from the heat and drain thoroughly. Transfer the vegetables to a food processor. Add the butter, then puree the mixture until smooth and free of lumps. (This can also be done by hand with a potato masher).
  6. Taste and season with salt and pepper, as desired. Hold warm or gently reheat before serving.

This dish pairs well with a sauteed green such as fresh spigarello and NY Shuk Harissa with preserved lemon!

Angela GelsoGreatest Of All Time
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Citrus Circle of Trust

Come January, gone are the days of fresh picked apples. Locally grown berries and ripe stone fruit? A mere memory. Thankfully, citrus is in season, and one bite of these juicy, sweet fruits is a momentary escape to some far off grove. Read on and decide which is bite of Provisions produce is right for you!

Sweet: Cara Cara, Heritage Navel, and Blood Oranges, Pomelo (grapefruit’s less tart cousin)
Juicy: Page or Satsuma Mandarin
Extra Juicy: Sumo Mandarin – Nailah, our Produce Buyer’s top pick!
Tart: Oro Blanco and Ruby Red Grapefruit
Unique: Meyer Lemon (sweet and tart!)
Buddha’s Hand – This citrus has no pulp or flesh, but the rind gives off a heavenly citrus and lavender aroma. Add it to a cocktail, prepare in a marmalade, candy it or swap it for lemon in dressings or in batters!

Meg ChristmanCitrus Circle of Trust
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How To Roast a Boston Butt

We checked in with our Head Butcher, Lena Diaz to see how she would go about roasting one of her favorite cuts – the Pork Butt a.k.a. Boston Butt. Her biggest tip is to allow the meat to roast slowly. With a recipe this simple, you don’t have to make a day of it, but you will enjoy the aromas from the morning until the time you finally get to dig in at night!

Ingredients:
One 8-10lb pork butt
Handful of toasted coriander seeds
Handful of toasted fennel seeds
4 cloves fresh garlic, pressed in a morter & pestle, or chopped finely
Ground Cinnamon
Garlic
Salt a generous amount, this is a large cut of meat after all!

Alternately- If you’d rather get more creative you can also just clean out your spice rack. Make sure to toast any whole spices to make the most out of their aromatic qualities and of course use plenty of salt to rub!

Directions:
The Night Before

1. Season your Roast
Rub the pork butt liberally with the toasted seeds, garlic, and salt. Add a dash of cinnamon all over the butt. Place the cut in a casserole dish and leave overnight.

Roasting Day
2. Remove roast from refrigerator and let it rest until it reaches room temp.
3. Preheat your oven to 250 degrees, about 15 minutes.
4. When both the oven and the roast are ready, place the casserole dish in the oven, uncovered.
5. Roast for approximately 8 hours, checking for tenderness periodically.
6. When the roast is fork tender you may remove it from the oven.
7. (Optional) If the roast needs a little extra color on the exterior, you can raise the oven temp to 450 degrees and let it roast for up to an additional 15 minutes.

Let it stand for a few minutes and then enjoy alongside roast vegetables and a glass of wine!

*Photo by Alberto Vargas 

Meg ChristmanHow To Roast a Boston Butt
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Tastings & Cheer at The Greene Grape

 

Thursday 12/22
Doc’s Absinthe – 5pm-7pm
Maybe Santa would like a shot of absinthe in lieu of milk with his cookies this year?

Friday 12/23
Polaner – 5pm-7pm
We’ll be popping open an all new rosé champagne!

Wednesday 12/28
Champagne Tasting – 5pm-7pm
A selection of champagnes tasted with our own Wine Buyer – Mike Robertson!

Thursday 12/29
Copper & Kings Brandy – 5pm-7pm
Taste this bold, spicy brandy that has aromas of orchard fruit, vanilla, caramel & brown sugar.

Friday 12/30
David Bowler – 5pm-7pm

 

Meg ChristmanTastings & Cheer at The Greene Grape
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