Parent Teachers Conference

Notebooks? ✅ Backpack? ✅ Shaker & strainer? Wait, you thought we this was a back-to-school list for the kids? Whether you’re in grad students, teachers, or parents prepping children for a new school year, the start of back-to-school season often brings with it a return to the classic disciplines of reading, writing, arithmetic, and–of course–sipping.

The good news is that cocktails and cocktail ideas are practically dripping from the pages of so many of the world’s great books. But don’t take our word for it. Pull up a chair and put on your glasses– here are a few of our favorite learned libations.

Reading | Rob Roy

This cocktail takes its name from the main character in Sir Walter Scott’s 1817 novel inspired by the life of Robert Roy MacGregor, a Scottish folk hero who lived figure who lived during the 17th century. Sir Walter, himself a Scot, is widely hailed as the world’s first popular novelist, making this cocktail the perfect accompaniment for any literary page turner.

Combine the Scotch, vermouth, and bitters in a shaker or mixing glass. Stir to combine and strain the mixture into a chilled coupe or highball glass, then garnish with the cherry.

Writing | Hemingway Daiquiri

If there was ever a writer with a connection to hooch, it’s Ernest Hemingway. In fact, Hemingway’s love of drinking inspired fellow writer Philip Greene to pen To Have and Have Another, a book about Hemingway’s tippling habits and the drinks that found their way into his writing. According to legend, this cocktail came about when “Papa,” as Hemingway was known in Havana, tried the classic Daiquiri at a local bar. “Not bad,” he quipped, and stated his preference for the drink with no sugar and twice as much rum. The rest, as they say, was history.

Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake well, then strain into a chilled coupe or cocktail glass. Garnish with a slice of lime.

‘Rithmetic | Einstein

Don’t let the numbers scare you. Math is all about ideas. Renown scientist – and mathematician – Albert Einstein knew that better than most. “Pure mathematics is, in its way, the poetry of logical ideas,” he wrote in a 1935 letter to The New York Times. “One seeks the most general ideas of operation which will bring together in simple, logical and unified form the largest possible circle of formal relationships.” Our take on this brilliant, flavorful cocktail, which was developed by bartender Jason Winters and first appeared in Food & Wine, does just that by exploring the unique way vodka, aged tequila, and citrus relate to one another, enticing the palate.

 

Add the tequila to a chilled coupe or martini glass. Rinse the glass with the tequila and discard. Next, add the vodka to a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake very well, then strain the mixture into the glass. Garnish with the orange and lemon twists. Eureka! (That’s math for “Cheers.”)

Angela GelsoParent Teachers Conference

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