Recipes

Recipe: Three Bean Salad with Charred Scallions & Smoked Tomato Vinaigrette

If you’re like anyone these days, your pantry is full o’ beans (and pasta, and rice, and…). Now that you’ve got the beans, what are you going to do with them?

We’ve got at least one tasty solution—this three-bean recipe by our Head Chef Andrew Werblin! With a flavorful smoked tomato vinaigrette and charred scallions for a little kick, you won’t make this one just once.

Ingredients

Bean Salad

1 can Pinto Bean, rinsed and drained
1 can Black Bean, rinsed drained
1 can White Beans, rinsed and drained
Or substitute above beans with 1/3 lb your choice of 3 beans, simmered until tender
1/4 cup Caper
1/2 cup Scallion, charred, sliced
1/2 cup Cucumber, seeded and diced
1/2 cup Smoked Tomato Vinaigrette (recipe follows)
1 tsp Salt
1/2 tsp Pepper

Smoked Tomato Vinaigrette

1 ea Tomato, diced small
1/2 cup Olive Oil
1 clove Garlic, minced
1 ea Shallot, minced
1 tsp Liquid Smoke
1/4 cup Balsamic Vinegar
1/4 cup White Wine Vinegar
1 tbsp Dijon Mustard
1 tbsp Honey
1 tsp Worcestershire
1 tsp Smoked Paprika
2 sprigs Parsley, rough chopped
1 tsp Salt
1/2 tsp Pepper

Let’s Get Cooking!

Toss scallions with 1 tbsp olive oil. Heat a saute pan over high heat and saute until browned. Place all ingredients in a bowl together. Whisk to mix and slowly whisk in olive oil. Enjoy!

Carla Bueno-SandersRecipe: Three Bean Salad with Charred Scallions & Smoked Tomato Vinaigrette
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Not Just Any Hot Chocolate: Earl Grey Hot Chocolate

A chilly day framed in the window, a blanket over your lap, a hot mug of deliciousness held in both hands, and a solidly blank to-do list. That’s the dream, right? All the variables are up to you, of course, but when we’re looking for a comforting drink, sometimes we’re looking for something new. Our do-it-all Erin has been serving up this Earl Grey hot chocolate in our offices, and we think it’s so good you ought to try it too.

Ingredients:

2 sachets of Earl Grey tea
2 tbsp hot chocolate mix
4 oz water
4 oz milk (plant-based milks work fine too!)
Whipped cream for bonus points

Let’s Get Cooking!

  1. Bring water to a boil, and pour 4oz into your favorite mug (or fill your mug halfway). Place tea sachets in water to brew for 3-5 minutes—any longer and it will be bitter.
  2. While your tea steeps, heat your milk of choice in a small pot. This will be quick, so keep an eye on it!
  3. Remove tea sachets, and stir in hot chocolate mix until fully dissolved.
  4. Pour in your heated milk and mix until everything is incorporated.
  5. Top your hot chocolate with whipped cream, directly proportional to how cozy you’re feeling.
Carla Bueno-SandersNot Just Any Hot Chocolate: Earl Grey Hot Chocolate
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The Only Comfort Food That Matters: A Macaroni & Cheese Recipe

When it comes to comfort food, everyone’s got their top five, but no one can disagree: Mac and cheese reigns supreme. There’s something about even the basest combination of pasta and saucy cheese that makes it as satisfying to cook as it is to eat. Because it’s such a blank canvas, it means everyone also has their own take on how to put together this classic dish.

This week, in the spirit of staying home and keeping cozy, we’re offering a recipe that’s a collaboration between our Beer Buyer, Brian Cullen, and our own Carla Bueno. Plymouth Hot Pepper Cheddar provides a strong base with a nice kick, while Aarewasser brings a buttery, raclette-style richness that will deepen all your flavors.

Brian recommends the Greenhouse Pils from Evil Twin Brewing NYC to pair with this mac. This super crisp, light yet flavorful German-style pilsner balances perfectly against the dense, savory richness of the king of comfort food.

Ingredients:

1 lb (or 500g) macaroni pasta
1/2 lb Plymouth Hot Pepper Cheddar, coarsely grated
1/2 lb Aarewasser, chopped into small pieces
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup buttermilk
3 tbsp cultured butter
2 tbsp all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp paprika
1/2 tsp dry mustard
1/2 tsp ground sage
Salt & pepper to taste
2-4 cloves of garlic, chopped finely
1 bunch scallions, chopped
1/4 cup panko breadcrumbs

Let’s Get Cooking!

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter or otherwise grease a 9×13 baking pan and set aside.
  2. In a large pot, bring salted boiling water to a boil, and cook your pasta of choice according to package directions. Drain and set aside.
  3. While the pasta is cooking, melt 2 tbsp butter in large sauté pan on medium-high heat. Cook garlic in butter for no longer than 30 seconds, then add flour and whisk to create your roux. Reduce temperature to medium-low.
  4. Begin pouring heavy cream in small quantities into your roux, whisking as you go to create your bechamel. Refrain from pouring until previous pour has fully combined with the roux.
  5. Repeat with buttermilk. Remember, you don’t need to rush this!
  6. Once your bechamel is complete, add salt, pepper, paprika, mustard, and sage. Let simmer while you chop your scallions.
  7. Add that cheese into your bechamel! Set a small amount of cheddar aside, equivalent to about 1/8 cup.
  8. Once the cheese is fully incorporated, add your cooked pasta and chopped scallions, mixing well.
  9. Pour the entire contents of the sauté pan into your 9×13 greased baking pan.
  10. In a small skillet, melt remaining tbsp of butter and add your breadcrumbs, toasting and coating them. Combine with remaining cheddar and quickly spread the mixture across the top of the macaroni and cheese.
  11. Place baking pan in oven for 30 minutes until breadcrumb topping is crispy, then allow to cool before serving. Don’t forget the beer!
Carla Bueno-SandersThe Only Comfort Food That Matters: A Macaroni & Cheese Recipe
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DIY: Drink It Yourself

If a certain Staten Island groundhog is to be believed, Spring will arrive early this year. Nevertheless, lazy winter weekends are the perfect opportunity to cozy up with all sorts of projects on your to-do (or wanna-do) list. Whether Marie Kondo-ing your cabinets or trying out new recipes, DIY projects are the perfect way to beat those midwinter, cabin fever blues. Now, we know that all that tinkering can work up a thirst. Never fear, here are some ideas (and a cocktail) to whet your whistle.

Pimento Dram Liqueur

Spicy, sweet, and intense, pimento dram is made from allspice (pimento berries) and rum. Centuries ago, British colonizers coined the term “allspice” because the crushed berry combines the flavors of cinnamon, nutmeg and clove. Originally to add spice to rum and tiki drinks, pimento dram can be used to add depth and complexity to nearly any cocktail.

1 750 ml bottle of light rum (we like Denizen 3-year Aged Rum)
16 oz brown sugar
8 oz water

Using a spice grinder or mortar and pestle, crush the allspice berries to a medium-fine grind. They should look similar to coffee grounds as used in a French press.
Pour the grinds into a saucepan, then add 1 cup of the rum.
Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat.
Remove the rum from the heat, and let cool only slightly.
Pour the mixture into a clean, empty 750-ml wine or liquor bottle.
Add the remaining rum to the mixture, then cover and allow to sit for about two weeks.
Filter the mixture through cheesecloth, then again through a coffee filter.
Combine the brown sugar and rum to make a simple syrup.
Add the syrup to the bottle, stir to combine, then seal and let the mixture sit for 30 days.

Falernum

Best known for its use in tropical or tiki-style cocktails, falernum is a liqueur flavored with ginger, lime, almond and baking spices. No one knows how it was invented, but the mixture dates back to 19th century Barbados.

6 oz Smith & Cross Navy Strength Rum
9 limes, zested
40 whole cloves
1.5 oz ginger, peeled and grated
2 T almonds, toasted, blanched and slivered
14 oz. rich simple syrup (2 parts sugar, 1 part water)
¼ tsp almond extract
4.5 oz fresh lime juice

Combine the rum, lime zest, cloves, ginger, and almonds in a jar and seal tightly. Allow the mixture to infuse at room temperature for 24 hours.
Strain the mixture through a cheesecloth, taking care to squeeze the solids.
Add the rich simple syrup, almond extract, and lime juice, then shake well to combine.
Use immediately or store in the refrigerator, tightly sealed, for up to 1 month.

Mr. Manager

1 oz Denizen 3-year Aged Rum
1 oz Mezcal (we suggest Del Maguey Vida or Banhez Joven)
¾ oz falernum
1⁄2 oz lime juice
¼ oz pimento dram
Lime peel, for garnish

Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker filled with ice.
Shake well, and strain the mixture into a chilled coupe or other serving glass.
Cheers to a DIY job well done!

Mike FunkDIY: Drink It Yourself
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A Sweet Note Played on the Limoncello: Limoncello Recipe

One of the best parts of January is avoiding the cold by staying in and working on DIY projects. One classic seasonal concoction is homemade limoncello. With some delicious Sorrento lemons and this easy recipe by Wine & Spirits Manager Sam Kling, you can be extra authentic with this Italian classic!

  • Use a vegetable peeler to remove the skin from a dozen Sorrento lemons. Try to avoid as much of the white pith as possible. Scrape off any pith you do get with a paring knife.
  • Add the peels to a quart jar and cover with a bottle of vodka, like Albany Distilling Co.’s ALB Vodka. Let that steep for two weeks.
  • A day before the two weeks are up, peel 6 more lemons. Add the peels to a bowl and cover with a pound of sugar, allowing the citrus oils to infuse with the sugar overnight (cover with plastic wrap or similar).
  • The next day, add the sugar and lemon peels to 2 1/2 cups of water and simmer until the sugar dissolves and it reduces slightly. Let the syrup cool, then combine it with the vodka and lemon infusion.
  • Allow that to mingle at room temperature in a dark place for another week or two, then strain the peels out, and bottle into recycled glass bottles of your choice (make sure to wash them thoroughly first—the swing tops are best, but wine bottles work).
  • Pop the bottles in the freezer and serve your limoncello chilled!
Carla Bueno-SandersA Sweet Note Played on the Limoncello: Limoncello Recipe
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Making the Case for Leftovers

Ah, leftovers. Thanksgiving may have come, but it’s certainly not gone. A couple good heaps of mashed potatoes, part of a dish of stuffing, and a select few slices of pie are likely haunting your fridge, even if you plied your guests with takeout containers of food at the door. Most likely of all, there’s something like half a bird in your kitchen, earmarked for a week of turkey sandwiches and other quick lunch items. Before you hit that turkey event horizon, we’ve got a recipe—that you can double or even triple—from our very own Social Media maverick, Erin!

Leftover Turkey Curry

  1. Melt butter or ghee in a large, heavy skillet on medium-high.
  2. Add onion, Tikka Masala spice blend, tomato paste, garlic, and ginger. Stirring constantly, cook until fragrant, about 2 to 3 minutes.
  3. Toss in cubed turkey, letting flavors combine, at least another minute.
  4. Pour in broth and bring to a simmer. Add coconut milk or cashew cream and reduce heat to medium. Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes.
  5. Stir in scallions and cilantro; salt to taste. Serve over rice or m’smen.

*Cashew Cream

  1. Submerge cashews in cold water and soak for 4 to 8 hours or soak in boiling water for 30 minutes
  2. Drain and place cashews in a high-powered blender. Add enough water to just cover the cashews with a pinch of salt. Blend until creamy, at least 1 minute.

Made a beautiful turkey leftovers curry dish? Tag us @greenegrape and show us!

Carla Bueno-SandersMaking the Case for Leftovers
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We’ve Got Elote Time On Our Hands

While there are plenty of foods that are quintessentially summer, none are quite the simple pleasure of corn on the cob. Whether grilled in their own leaves or roasted hard over charcoal, enjoyed on its own merits or slathered in butter and seasoning, it’s an endlessly customizable meal; it’s never too hot for an ear of corn. Angela’s elote salad recipe brings a multicultural twist on a classic with K-Pop Kimchi Mayo, our new favorite condiment!

Ingredients:
6 ears of corn
1/4 cup K-Pop Kimchi Mayo Sauce
4 oz. cotija cheese, crumbled
1 bunch cilantro, chopped fine
Lime juice (to taste)
Salt (to taste)

Instructions:
Heat an oiled grill to medium-high heat and roast ears of corn for about 7 minutes, or until kernels are tender and all sides are roasted. Chop the kernels from their cobs, then combine and incorporate all other ingredients in a large bowl. Serve immediately, and enjoy your elote!

Carla Bueno-SandersWe’ve Got Elote Time On Our Hands
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Dry Rub Lemon Herb Chicken

Our Head Chef knows a thing or two about preparing a great rotisserie chicken! A crispy, juicy oven roasted chicken prepared with Herbs de Provence, lemon peel, fennel and a little brown sugar. We recommend trying this recipe with one of our free range Goffle Road Chickens. Both are available in our shop either cooked in the rotisserie, or uncooked from our butcher counter!

This recipe will give you a super crispy skin and a deep aromatic flavor that pairs perfectly with roasted potatoes and braised greens. Feel free to double or triple the rub recipe and save in an airtight container to keep on hand for future use. We recommend using a meat thermometer while cooking the bird as it’s an invaluable tool and an asset in the kitchen. If you don’t have one on hand you can pick one up along with the rest of the ingredients online or at Greene Grape Provisions! (If spices are out of stock or not available online, please don’t hesitate to call and ask for them to be added to your online order.)

Lemon & Herb Dry Rub

  • 1 whole chicken (approx. 4-4.5 lbs.)
  • 1 tbs Herbs de Provence
  • 1 tsp dried lemon peel
  • 1 tsp marjoram
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • 1 tsp fennel seed (ground)
  • 2 tbs kosher salt
  • 1 ½ tbs dark brown sugar*

*You can omit the sugar if you prefer, but keeping it in the rub yields a darker, more crispy skin.

Directions:

  1. Combine all rub ingredients, making sure to break up any clumps
  2. Pat your chicken dry inside and out
  3. Truss the chicken. Here’s a quick tutorial if you need one  
  4. Season inside of bird with rub, and sprinkle rub generously on outside, starting with the sides and bottom and finishing with the top (breast side)
  5. For best flavor, let your chicken sit for  3-6 hours, or just go straight to cooking
  6. Preheat your oven to 400ºF, or 375ºF if you have a convection feature
  7. Place chicken on your roasting rack or cookie tray
  8. Put in oven, and roast for ½ hour. Turn oven down to 350ºF and continue to roast
  9. After 1 hour, poke the thermometer into the deepest part of the thigh where it meets the leg to test doneness, without touching the bone. Once it hits 165ºF, the chicken is ready, If you prefer a more well-done bird, aim for 175-180°F
  10. Once chicken is cooked, let it rest for 10-15 minutes before carving. This allows the protein to relax and the juices to flow evenly throughout the meat
  11. Carve by removing the wings first then the leg and thigh, followed by removing the breast by running your knife right along the breast plate the length of the breast
Angela GelsoDry Rub Lemon Herb Chicken
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Angel’s recipe for a happy New Year

Gung Hay Fat Choy – Happy Chinese New Year!

For many Chinese families around the world, Tuesday February 5th is a significant day. Usually falling on the first new moon of the year, the celebration of Chinese New Year, or Spring Festival, is a most spectacular tradition. But, don’t let winter fool you, the name Spring Festival is a celebration of the end of winter as we look to the change in seasons.

Preparations often begin several days beforehand. It’s tradition to sweep and dust the previous year away and decorate the walls and doors with red and gold (for prosperity and happiness), and of course place oranges and kumquats on the table represent good luck!

On The Table

You just can’t celebrate a Spring Festival without spring rolls or dumplings, which we love to dip in the umami rich, Lahtt sauce.
Longevity noodles are a holiday favorite and can be made with any type of long thin noodle. The challenge is to eat each noodle with one big slurp and as little chewing as possible. These long noodles signify long life, and as the superstition goes, any chomping may cut life short!

This feast isn’t complete without the main entree at the center of all Chinese celebrations but especially during Chinese New Year – steamed fish. Truly quick and simple to prepare, this dish is also timeless and comforting. Stop by the butcher counter to see what’s in season and follow this simple recipe 🙂

Steamed Fish

Ingredients:
1 whole
White fish (Like Sea Bass, Tilapia or Red Snapper)
3 stalks of Scallion, green and white parts separated
6 slices Ginger, half to place on top of fish to steam and half Julienned
3 tbsp Shaoxing cooking wine, or Mirin.
2 tsp Maldon Sea Salt

Garnishes:
1/3 cup
Chopped Cilantro
3 tbsp
Red Boat Fish Sauce (optional)
3 tbsp Cooking Oil (optional)
1 thin slice Ginger (optional)

Onto the cooking

1. Make sure your fish is gutted, descaled and patted dry. Make 3-4 cuts on each side of the fish. Rub the fish with cooking wine and then salt. Let it sit for about half hour to a full hour.
2. Chop up or mash the green parts of the scallion, which becomes the bed for the fish. Julienne the white parts and mix with the julienned ginger and cilantro and set aside.
3. Place the fish on top of the scallion bed and insert the ginger slices to the cuts.

4. Place the fish into your choice of steamer, typically a wok with several inches of water and a bowl or rack to elevate the plate is sufficient if you don’t have a steamer.
5. Cover with a lid and steam for 10 minutes. Turn off heat and let sit, covered for another 3 minutes. Check if meat inside the slits are done – meat should be opaque down to the bone, but the bone will be translucent.
6. Remove the fish from the steamer and drain the excess water, then remove the ginger slices and scallions.
7. Top with the julienned ginger, scallions and cilantro.

Optional: Flash Fry
Heat up 3 tablespoons cooking oil in a pan and add the slice of ginger to it. When the ginger begins to sizzle, remove from heat and pour it over the fish.

Serve with Red Boat Fish sauce, pour on top or on the side for dipping.

Angela GelsoAngel’s recipe for a happy New Year
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In Through The Oat Door

How to survive the 2019 Oatly, oat milk, shortage.

Oatly, the oat milk brand, is in high demand, and finding this popular new milk substitute in NYC has just gotten harder! While we may have been one of the early adopters of this fantastic beverage, it has become so popular that the supplier just can’t keep up! Not to worry though, we also stock Elmhurst Milked Oats! Made with whole grain oats, cane sugar, filtered water and a touch of sea salt, Elmhurst is a great brand making some delicious dairy alternatives. Of course, if you’re feeling really adventurous you can try making your own oat milk, with this simple recipe:

Ingredients:

1 c Steel Cut Oats
6 c Filtered Water
1 tsp Date Syrup
1 pinch Sea Salt

Tools required:

Nut milk strainer (You can substitute Cheesecloth or a Cold Brew Bag)
Blender
Fine mesh strainer

Soak the oats overnight in two cups of filtered water. Strain the oats through a mesh strainer, and place them into your blender. Add 4 cups of filtered water to the oats, and purée the mixture as much as possible. Pour the contents of the blender into a nut milk strainer, brew bag, or over several layers of cheesecloth. Be careful to reserve as much liquid as possible whilst straining out the oat pulp over a large bowl or pitcher. Once the oat solids are removed, pour the liquid back into the blender and add the date syrup and sea salt. Blend to incorporate, and use as desired. At this stage, you can add other flavors and sweeteners to the oatmilk. Some like to add turmeric, chocolate, vanilla, and even chocolate.

Angela GelsoIn Through The Oat Door
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