All posts tagged: register

Where’s the Citrus?

Citrus season is here at last! You might want to citrus self down for this one, because despite some delays, we’ve got more citrus varietals than ever this year. They’re coming in so quickly and so fresh you won’t be able to find them on our website just yet, but they’ll be easy to spot in our store. Thanks to our rockstar Produce Buyer, Laura Rose Dailey, even the basics have a little something extra!

Basics like heirloom navel oranges from Rising Ranches in California, a small fruit operation that only picks tree-ripened fruit for the highest quality harvest. They’re bringing us other citrus, too, like iconic blood oranges, candy-sweet Cara Cara oranges, and lesser-known sour Sevilles. Sevilles aren’t your everyday snacking orange, known for their deep, bitter flavor traditionally used in marmalades. They bring real complexity, too, to classic citrus treats like key lime pie—use these in your custard instead for a fresh twist!

Rising Ranches isn’t the only farm supplying our produce department with uncommon citrus. Buck Brand Citrus, operating from Deer Creek Heights Ranch—also from California—is responsible for the massive pomelos you won’t be able to help but notice on your next visit. Not just any pomelos, either—these are African Shaddock pomelos, a strain of pomelos with all the bright flavor you expect, but noticeably lower acidity and sourness. Other easily noshable varieties lining our shelves include satsumas and staff favorite Sumo mandarins. Both feature a handle for easy peeling, whether the satsuma’s long shiny leaves or the Sumo’s hefty nub that matches its considerable size. Don’t count out limequats, either! A cross between limes and kumquats, limequats are a perfect balance of sweetness and mouth-puckering sourness you won’t want to put down.

Chefs and aspiring cooks alike won’t just want to try the Seville, either. Sorrento lemons (also known as Santa Teresa lemons), easily identified by their knobbly peel, are the lemon of choice for making limoncello liqueur, and Wine & Spirits is stocked up with all the clear spirits you’ll need for that project. Meyer lemons have earned their notoriety for being the perfect baking lemon, of course. You don’t have to make your own Earl Grey with Bergamot lemons, whose floral sweetness gives the tea its signature aroma, but we won’t stop you, either.

Reading through this, you might wonder: Why is it all coming from faraway California? Doesn’t citrus come from Florida? The answer is that a tough few growing seasons, coupled with Florida harvesting laws, means very little citrus is coming from Florida right now. Growers are hard at work recovering their groves, and some experts say that work is already starting to pay off. In the meantime, we’ll be supporting small ranches and farms where we can to bring you the zest of the season.

Carla Bueno-SandersWhere’s the Citrus?
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A Little Wellness Pick Me Up That Won’t Put You Down

Could your January use a little hair of the dog, a little boost, a little wellness? A cure for what ails ya might be in order after a December full of holiday parties, relatives, and a work life balance that might as well have been a see-saw. All you want to do is hibernate until spring! Making a list of resolutions feels trite; it takes on a different flavor, though, when you rename it self-care.

Maybe you’re cutting out dairy—don’t worry, we’ve got Oatly in stock, though Elmhurst also makes a range of great non-dairy milks. If you’re trying to chase away the last of a 2019 cold, Monfefo’s tried and true ginger and turmeric shots now come in glass bottles to reduce their plastic production. Turmeric is also known to boost joint health, but if you’re looking for a bigger batch than a few ounces, you can make your own healthful brew at home with Diaspora Co’s single-origin turmeric, sourced directly from the family farmers that grow it in India.

The most classic resolution, naturally, is starting a new exercise regimen. It can seem like most fitness-oriented food and drink is full of unpronounceable ingredients that only weigh you down. Your standard energy bar often feels like chewing on putty dipped in faux chocolate. Energy drinks come in colors not found in nature and can taste more like the factory they were bottled in. Luckily, we’ve got the goods to keep you moving and focused.

Pack your gym duffel, hiking pack or even just your everyday bag with dairy-free, gluten-free energy bars like O.W.L., Yes, and Kuli Kuli moringa bars—O.W.L., made locally, has been a cashier favorite for years. Ingredients like protein-rich peanut butter, coconut nectar, and noted super-green moringa will fortify you, while being so delicious you’ll be looking forward to snack time. For the more serious gym goers, Siren Protein Bites pack 12 grams of plant-based protein into every serving! Don’t forget to hydrate—our current pick is Recoup, a more natural take on energy drinks with revitalizing local maple water, and a healthy dose of muscle-soothing organic ginger that gives it a kick. You’ll want to pick up every flavor!

Of course, there’s no one way to focus on health in the new year. So let’s drink—or eat—to your health in 2020, no matter what wellness trail you blaze.

Carla Bueno-SandersA Little Wellness Pick Me Up That Won’t Put You Down
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Making the Case for Leftovers

Ah, leftovers. Thanksgiving may have come, but it’s certainly not gone. A couple good heaps of mashed potatoes, part of a dish of stuffing, and a select few slices of pie are likely haunting your fridge, even if you plied your guests with takeout containers of food at the door. Most likely of all, there’s something like half a bird in your kitchen, earmarked for a week of turkey sandwiches and other quick lunch items. Before you hit that turkey event horizon, we’ve got a recipe—that you can double or even triple—from our very own Social Media maverick, Erin!

Leftover Turkey Curry

  1. Melt butter or ghee in a large, heavy skillet on medium-high.
  2. Add onion, Tikka Masala spice blend, tomato paste, garlic, and ginger. Stirring constantly, cook until fragrant, about 2 to 3 minutes.
  3. Toss in cubed turkey, letting flavors combine, at least another minute.
  4. Pour in broth and bring to a simmer. Add coconut milk or cashew cream and reduce heat to medium. Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes.
  5. Stir in scallions and cilantro; salt to taste. Serve over rice or m’smen.

*Cashew Cream

  1. Submerge cashews in cold water and soak for 4 to 8 hours or soak in boiling water for 30 minutes
  2. Drain and place cashews in a high-powered blender. Add enough water to just cover the cashews with a pinch of salt. Blend until creamy, at least 1 minute.

Made a beautiful turkey leftovers curry dish? Tag us @greenegrape and show us!

Carla Bueno-SandersMaking the Case for Leftovers
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All Soup-ed Up

A brisk day, a sweater and a big scarf, and a bowl of hot, delicious soup—just some of ingredients for a perfect fall day. While we may not be able to control the weather, we’ve got the most important part: Soup! Our neighborhood-famous soup is finally back, and our new Head Chef, Andrew Werblin, is excited to bring his recipes to your table. Look forward to classics like chicken noodle and French onion to ward off the cold. You’re sure to add some new favorites to your list, though, like spicy and sour chicken tom kha gai, or a hearty West African peanut stew!

Don’t forget to keep your soup card handy, of course—ten stamps will earn you a free soup, which could be just the pick-me-up you need as the days get longer. Ask your cashier for a card today!

Carla Bueno-SandersAll Soup-ed Up
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Gotta Blame It On My Juice

While autumn’s first day might still be a ways away on the calendar, sweater weather has definitely arrived! The neighborhood is filling back up as folks make their return from nearby getaways and far-flung adventures, and families are bustling to get their kids ready for the first day of school. We’ve got our own back to school list ready, from after-school snacks to lunchbox essentials to easy dinners, that are sure to make the grade with everyone! 

Juice boxes have always been a lunchbox staple, but this season we’re upgrading the juice game. You’ll want to keep an eagle eye out for Lumi Juice, a new collection of cold-pressed juices. These are made from organic ingredients like beets, cucumbers, grapefruit, and granny smith apples, just to name a few. They’re sure to power up anyone’s lunch, whether in the school yard or the office break room, as well as fuel workouts and early grab-and-go breakfasts. Need something with a bigger kick to it to wake you up, and maybe even keep playground cooties at bay? Try Lumi’s health shots—the jalapeño shot is bound to kickstart your brain, while bringing something new to the shots scene. 

If you’re feeling more than just thirsty, few snack combos are as classic as juice and cookies. Try satisfying your sweet tooth with Makabi & Sons shortbread sandwich cookies, new to our shelves. We just can’t stop munching on them! Made by hand by founder Eiman Behmanesh in LA, these cookies bring new meaning to thinking globally and eating locally, infusing flavors from afar into buttery cookies and smooth creme. It’s hard to choose between spicy chocolate and cayenne, smooth and aromatic earl grey, and earthy matcha with black sesame. Our best recommendation is not to choose at all and stock up! Whether you’re sneaking one into a lunchbox or hosting a weekend shindig, you won’t regret treating yourself. 

Check out our back to school selection here!

Carla Bueno-SandersGotta Blame It On My Juice
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Taught By The Glass—Summer Wine Classes

Have you ever wondered where rosé gets its hue? Do you ponder the origins of the Tiki craze? Maybe you’d just like to learn how to taste wine and cheese without all the pretentious airs. Whether you’re a seasoned wine enthusiast or just feeling thirsty, our Summer Wine Classes have got you covered! 

Join us at the Annex this summer for comprehensive 90 minute classes led by our experts from Wine & Spirits, Sam Kling and Michele Thomas. Take the Mythbusting Rosé class on August 16th to find out how rosé gets its rosy tint, as well as about local producers and what makes them worth supporting. Taste through five beverages, from delicate wines to fan-favorite ciders, learning how to savor them and pair them. Next, try our Tiki, Do You Love Me? class to learn the surprising history of Tiki cocktails, then sip on three different rums and three classic Tiki drinks as you learn how to taste them. You won’t leave empty-handed, either, because we’ll be sending you home with cocktail recipes to elevate your next get-together.

In September, you’ll want to come back for more with our New York State of Wine & Cheese class. We’ll teach you about New York wines and cheeses and the producers behind them, how to taste wine and cheese, how to pair them, and more. We’ll also provide plenty of snacks with every class so you can munch your way through your education. 

Sign up today at www.greenegrape.com/events and get learning! 

Carla Bueno-SandersTaught By The Glass—Summer Wine Classes
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We’ve Got Elote Time On Our Hands

While there are plenty of foods that are quintessentially summer, none are quite the simple pleasure of corn on the cob. Whether grilled in their own leaves or roasted hard over charcoal, enjoyed on its own merits or slathered in butter and seasoning, it’s an endlessly customizable meal; it’s never too hot for an ear of corn. Angela’s elote salad recipe brings a multicultural twist on a classic with K-Pop Kimchi Mayo, our new favorite condiment!

Ingredients:
6 ears of corn
1/4 cup K-Pop Kimchi Mayo Sauce
4 oz. cotija cheese, crumbled
1 bunch cilantro, chopped fine
Lime juice (to taste)
Salt (to taste)

Instructions:
Heat an oiled grill to medium-high heat and roast ears of corn for about 7 minutes, or until kernels are tender and all sides are roasted. Chop the kernels from their cobs, then combine and incorporate all other ingredients in a large bowl. Serve immediately, and enjoy your elote!

Carla Bueno-SandersWe’ve Got Elote Time On Our Hands
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Dry Rub Lemon Herb Chicken

Our Head Chef knows a thing or two about preparing a great rotisserie chicken! Check out Head Chef Kenny Hockert’s latest recipe. A crispy, juicy oven roasted chicken prepared with Herbs de Provence, lemon peel, fennel and a little brown sugar. We recommend trying this with one of our free range Goffle Road Chickens. Both are available in our shop either cooked in the rotisserie, or raw from our butcher counter!

Stop by Saturday, March 14th to try this tasty recipe paired with a Bordeaux Blanc from 5-7pm at 765 Fulton St!

Notes From The Chef:

This recipe will give you a super crispy skin and a deep aromatic flavor that pairs perfectly with roasted potatoes and braised greens. Feel free to double or triple the rub recipe and save in an airtight container to keep on hand for future use. I recommend using a meat thermometer while cooking the bird as it’s an invaluable tool and an asset in the kitchen. If you don’t have one on hand you can pick one up along with the rest of the ingredients online or at Greene Grape Provisions!

Kenny’s Lemon & Herb Dry Rub

*You can omit the sugar if you prefer, but keeping it in the rub yields a darker, more crispy skin.

Directions:

  1. Combine all rub ingredients, making sure to break up any clumps
  2. Pat your chicken dry inside and out
  3. Truss the chicken. Here’s a quick tutorial if you need one  
  4. Season inside of bird with rub, and sprinkle rub generously on outside, starting with the sides and bottom and finishing with the top (breast side)
  5. For best flavor, let your chicken sit for  3-6 hours, or just go straight to cooking
  6. Preheat your oven to 400º F, or 375º F if you have a convection feature
  7. Place chicken on your roasting rack or cookie tray
  8. Put in oven, and roast for ½ hour. Turn oven down to 350º F and continue to roast
  9. After 1 hour, poke the thermometer into the deepest part of the thigh where it meets the leg to test doneness, without touching the bone. Once it hits 165ºF, the chicken is ready, If you prefer a more well-done bird, aim for 175-180 F
  10. Once chicken is cooked, let it rest for 10-15 minutes before carving. This allows the protein to relax and the juices to flow evenly throughout the meat
  11. Carve by removing the wings first then the leg and thigh, followed by removing the breast by running your knife right along the breast plate the length of the breast
Angela GelsoDry Rub Lemon Herb Chicken
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Angel’s recipe for a happy New Year

Gung Hay Fat Choy – Happy Chinese New Year!

For many Chinese families around the world, Tuesday February 5th is a significant day. Usually falling on the first new moon of the year, the celebration of Chinese New Year, or Spring Festival, is a most spectacular tradition. But, don’t let winter fool you, the name Spring Festival is a celebration of the end of winter as we look to the change in seasons.

Preparations often begin several days beforehand. It’s tradition to sweep and dust the previous year away and decorate the walls and doors with red and gold (for prosperity and happiness), and of course place oranges and kumquats on the table represent good luck!

On The Table

You just can’t celebrate a Spring Festival without spring rolls or dumplings, which we love to dip in the umami rich, Lahtt sauce.
Longevity noodles are a holiday favorite and can be made with any type of long thin noodle. The challenge is to eat each noodle with one big slurp and as little chewing as possible. These long noodles signify long life, and as the superstition goes, any chomping may cut life short!

This feast isn’t complete without the main entree at the center of all Chinese celebrations but especially during Chinese New Year – steamed fish. Truly quick and simple to prepare, this dish is also timeless and comforting. Stop by the butcher counter to see what’s in season and follow this simple recipe 🙂

Steamed Fish

Ingredients:
1 whole
White fish (Like Sea Bass, Tilapia or Red Snapper)
3 stalks of Scallion, green and white parts separated
6 slices Ginger, half to place on top of fish to steam and half Julienned
3 tbsp Shaoxing cooking wine, or Mirin.
2 tsp Maldon Sea Salt

Garnishes:
1/3 cup
Chopped Cilantro
3 tbsp
Red Boat Fish Sauce (optional)
3 tbsp Cooking Oil (optional)
1 thin slice Ginger (optional)

Onto the cooking

1. Make sure your fish is gutted, descaled and patted dry. Make 3-4 cuts on each side of the fish. Rub the fish with cooking wine and then salt. Let it sit for about half hour to a full hour.
2. Chop up or mash the green parts of the scallion, which becomes the bed for the fish. Julienne the white parts and mix with the julienned ginger and cilantro and set aside.
3. Place the fish on top of the scallion bed and insert the ginger slices to the cuts.

4. Place the fish into your choice of steamer, typically a wok with several inches of water and a bowl or rack to elevate the plate is sufficient if you don’t have a steamer.
5. Cover with a lid and steam for 10 minutes. Turn off heat and let sit, covered for another 3 minutes. Check if meat inside the slits are done – meat should be opaque down to the bone, but the bone will be translucent.
6. Remove the fish from the steamer and drain the excess water, then remove the ginger slices and scallions.
7. Top with the julienned ginger, scallions and cilantro.

Optional: Flash Fry
Heat up 3 tablespoons cooking oil in a pan and add the slice of ginger to it. When the ginger begins to sizzle, remove from heat and pour it over the fish.

Serve with Red Boat Fish sauce, pour on top or on the side for dipping.

Angela GelsoAngel’s recipe for a happy New Year
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Put a moringa on it.

Winter hibernation mode is often balanced by the adoption of a new workout routine, diet, or consumption of foods that will make us at least feel like we made it to the gym. The wellness industry is rising in popularity and the latest food trends lean on the benefits of natural ingredients and sources of energy. Super Moringa is no exception. Known as the Drumstick Tree or “Tree of Life,” and originating from South Asia. This powerhouse plant is said to be one of the most nutritious greens on the planet! Packed with an arsenal of amino acids, antioxidants and protein, moringa is sure to give you a super boost—and it doesn’t skimp on flavor! Zaamroot moringa powder is produced by a South Asian sister duo and is ethically sourced from women-owned farms in Zambia, where they grew up. There are a plethora of ways to use this powder, simply mix into your favorite smoothie or spruce it up for an instagram-worthy moringa smoothie bowl!

For busy bees on-the-go, Kuli Kuli dreamed up these delectable moringa energy bars that are a great alternative to granola. Encouraged as a “salad in a bar”, they contain a generous amount of protein, iron, calcium, along with all the benefits of a half cup of leafy moringa. As if that wasn’t enough, envision a delicious almond butter bar mixed with dates, and dressed in a rich dark chocolate. You’ll completely forget you’re eating something good for your body! If you’re hesitant to hop on the moringa train, these energy bars will swipe you in. Your taste buds will remember the ride and get a bonus serving of veggies along the way.

Angela GelsoPut a moringa on it.
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