All posts tagged: register

Taught By The Glass—Summer Wine Classes

Have you ever wondered where rosé gets its hue? Do you ponder the origins of the Tiki craze? Maybe you’d just like to learn how to taste wine and cheese without all the pretentious airs. Whether you’re a seasoned wine enthusiast or just feeling thirsty, our Summer Wine Classes have got you covered! 

Join us at the Annex this summer for comprehensive 90 minute classes led by our experts from Wine & Spirits, Sam Kling and Michele Thomas. Take the Mythbusting Rosé class on August 16th to find out how rosé gets its rosy tint, as well as about local producers and what makes them worth supporting. Taste through five beverages, from delicate wines to fan-favorite ciders, learning how to savor them and pair them. Next, try our Tiki, Do You Love Me? class to learn the surprising history of Tiki cocktails, then sip on three different rums and three classic Tiki drinks as you learn how to taste them. You won’t leave empty-handed, either, because we’ll be sending you home with cocktail recipes to elevate your next get-together.

In September, you’ll want to come back for more with our New York State of Wine & Cheese class. We’ll teach you about New York wines and cheeses and the producers behind them, how to taste wine and cheese, how to pair them, and more. We’ll also provide plenty of snacks with every class so you can munch your way through your education. 

Sign up today at www.greenegrape.com/events and get learning! 

Carla Bueno-SandersTaught By The Glass—Summer Wine Classes
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We’ve Got Elote Time On Our Hands

While there are plenty of foods that are quintessentially summer, none are quite the simple pleasure of corn on the cob. Whether grilled in their own leaves or roasted hard over charcoal, enjoyed on its own merits or slathered in butter and seasoning, it’s an endlessly customizable meal; it’s never too hot for an ear of corn. Angela’s elote salad recipe brings a multicultural twist on a classic with K-Pop Kimchi Mayo, our new favorite condiment!

Ingredients:
6 ears of corn
1/4 cup K-Pop Kimchi Mayo Sauce
4 oz. cotija cheese, crumbled
1 bunch cilantro, chopped fine
Lime juice (to taste)
Salt (to taste)

Instructions:
Heat an oiled grill to medium-high heat and roast ears of corn for about 7 minutes, or until kernels are tender and all sides are roasted. Chop the kernels from their cobs, then combine and incorporate all other ingredients in a large bowl. Serve immediately, and enjoy your elote!

Carla Bueno-SandersWe’ve Got Elote Time On Our Hands
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Dry Rub Lemon Herb Chicken

Our Head Chef knows a thing or two about preparing a great rotisserie chicken! Check out Head Chef Kenny Hockert’s latest recipe. A crispy, juicy oven roasted chicken prepared with Herbs de Provence, lemon peel, fennel and a little brown sugar. We recommend trying this with one of our free range Goffle Road Chickens. Both are available in our shop either cooked in the rotisserie, or raw from our butcher counter!

Stop by Saturday, March 14th to try this tasty recipe paired with a Bordeaux Blanc from 5-7pm at 765 Fulton St!

Notes From The Chef:

This recipe will give you a super crispy skin and a deep aromatic flavor that pairs perfectly with roasted potatoes and braised greens. Feel free to double or triple the rub recipe and save in an airtight container to keep on hand for future use. I recommend using a meat thermometer while cooking the bird as it’s an invaluable tool and an asset in the kitchen. If you don’t have one on hand you can pick one up along with the rest of the ingredients online or at Greene Grape Provisions!

Kenny’s Lemon & Herb Dry Rub

*You can omit the sugar if you prefer, but keeping it in the rub yields a darker, more crispy skin.

Directions:

  1. Combine all rub ingredients, making sure to break up any clumps
  2. Pat your chicken dry inside and out
  3. Truss the chicken. Here’s a quick tutorial if you need one  
  4. Season inside of bird with rub, and sprinkle rub generously on outside, starting with the sides and bottom and finishing with the top (breast side)
  5. For best flavor, let your chicken sit for  3-6 hours, or just go straight to cooking
  6. Preheat your oven to 400º F, or 375º F if you have a convection feature
  7. Place chicken on your roasting rack or cookie tray
  8. Put in oven, and roast for ½ hour. Turn oven down to 350º F and continue to roast
  9. After 1 hour, poke the thermometer into the deepest part of the thigh where it meets the leg to test doneness, without touching the bone. Once it hits 165ºF, the chicken is ready, If you prefer a more well-done bird, aim for 175-180 F
  10. Once chicken is cooked, let it rest for 10-15 minutes before carving. This allows the protein to relax and the juices to flow evenly throughout the meat
  11. Carve by removing the wings first then the leg and thigh, followed by removing the breast by running your knife right along the breast plate the length of the breast
Angela GelsoDry Rub Lemon Herb Chicken
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Angel’s recipe for a happy New Year

Gung Hay Fat Choy – Happy Chinese New Year!

For many Chinese families around the world, Tuesday February 5th is a significant day. Usually falling on the first new moon of the year, the celebration of Chinese New Year, or Spring Festival, is a most spectacular tradition. But, don’t let winter fool you, the name Spring Festival is a celebration of the end of winter as we look to the change in seasons.

Preparations often begin several days beforehand. It’s tradition to sweep and dust the previous year away and decorate the walls and doors with red and gold (for prosperity and happiness), and of course place oranges and kumquats on the table represent good luck!

On The Table

You just can’t celebrate a Spring Festival without spring rolls or dumplings, which we love to dip in the umami rich, Lahtt sauce.
Longevity noodles are a holiday favorite and can be made with any type of long thin noodle. The challenge is to eat each noodle with one big slurp and as little chewing as possible. These long noodles signify long life, and as the superstition goes, any chomping may cut life short!

This feast isn’t complete without the main entree at the center of all Chinese celebrations but especially during Chinese New Year – steamed fish. Truly quick and simple to prepare, this dish is also timeless and comforting. Stop by the butcher counter to see what’s in season and follow this simple recipe 🙂

Steamed Fish

Ingredients:
1 whole
White fish (Like Sea Bass, Tilapia or Red Snapper)
3 stalks of Scallion, green and white parts separated
6 slices Ginger, half to place on top of fish to steam and half Julienned
3 tbsp Shaoxing cooking wine, or Mirin.
2 tsp Maldon Sea Salt

Garnishes:
1/3 cup
Chopped Cilantro
3 tbsp
Red Boat Fish Sauce (optional)
3 tbsp Cooking Oil (optional)
1 thin slice Ginger (optional)

Onto the cooking

1. Make sure your fish is gutted, descaled and patted dry. Make 3-4 cuts on each side of the fish. Rub the fish with cooking wine and then salt. Let it sit for about half hour to a full hour.
2. Chop up or mash the green parts of the scallion, which becomes the bed for the fish. Julienne the white parts and mix with the julienned ginger and cilantro and set aside.
3. Place the fish on top of the scallion bed and insert the ginger slices to the cuts.

4. Place the fish into your choice of steamer, typically a wok with several inches of water and a bowl or rack to elevate the plate is sufficient if you don’t have a steamer.
5. Cover with a lid and steam for 10 minutes. Turn off heat and let sit, covered for another 3 minutes. Check if meat inside the slits are done – meat should be opaque down to the bone, but the bone will be translucent.
6. Remove the fish from the steamer and drain the excess water, then remove the ginger slices and scallions.
7. Top with the julienned ginger, scallions and cilantro.

Optional: Flash Fry
Heat up 3 tablespoons cooking oil in a pan and add the slice of ginger to it. When the ginger begins to sizzle, remove from heat and pour it over the fish.

Serve with Red Boat Fish sauce, pour on top or on the side for dipping.

Angela GelsoAngel’s recipe for a happy New Year
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Put a moringa on it.

Winter hibernation mode is often balanced by the adoption of a new workout routine, diet, or consumption of foods that will make us at least feel like we made it to the gym. The wellness industry is rising in popularity and the latest food trends lean on the benefits of natural ingredients and sources of energy. Super Moringa is no exception. Known as the Drumstick Tree or “Tree of Life,” and originating from South Asia. This powerhouse plant is said to be one of the most nutritious greens on the planet! Packed with an arsenal of amino acids, antioxidants and protein, moringa is sure to give you a super boost—and it doesn’t skimp on flavor! Zaamroot moringa powder is produced by a South Asian sister duo and is ethically sourced from women-owned farms in Zambia, where they grew up. There are a plethora of ways to use this powder, simply mix into your favorite smoothie or spruce it up for an instagram-worthy moringa smoothie bowl!

For busy bees on-the-go, Kuli Kuli dreamed up these delectable moringa energy bars that are a great alternative to granola. Encouraged as a “salad in a bar”, they contain a generous amount of protein, iron, calcium, along with all the benefits of a half cup of leafy moringa. As if that wasn’t enough, envision a delicious almond butter bar mixed with dates, and dressed in a rich dark chocolate. You’ll completely forget you’re eating something good for your body! If you’re hesitant to hop on the moringa train, these energy bars will swipe you in. Your taste buds will remember the ride and get a bonus serving of veggies along the way.

Angela GelsoPut a moringa on it.
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In Through The Oat Door

How to survive the 2019 Oatly, oat milk, shortage.

Oatly, the oat milk brand, is in high demand, and finding this popular new milk substitute in NYC has just gotten harder! While we may have been one of the early adopters of this fantastic beverage, it has become so popular that the supplier just can’t keep up! Not to worry though, we also stock Elmhurst Milked Oats! Made with whole grain oats, cane sugar, filtered water and a touch of sea salt, Elmhurst is a great brand making some delicious dairy alternatives. Of course, if you’re feeling really adventurous you can try making your own oat milk, with this simple recipe:

Ingredients:

1 c Steel Cut Oats
6 c Filtered Water
1 tsp Date Syrup
1 pinch Sea Salt

Tools required:

Nut milk strainer (You can substitute Cheesecloth or a Cold Brew Bag)
Blender
Fine mesh strainer

Soak the oats overnight in two cups of filtered water. Strain the oats through a mesh strainer, and place them into your blender. Add 4 cups of filtered water to the oats, and purée the mixture as much as possible. Pour the contents of the blender into a nut milk strainer, brew bag, or over several layers of cheesecloth. Be careful to reserve as much liquid as possible whilst straining out the oat pulp over a large bowl or pitcher. Once the oat solids are removed, pour the liquid back into the blender and add the date syrup and sea salt. Blend to incorporate, and use as desired. At this stage, you can add other flavors and sweeteners to the oatmilk. Some like to add turmeric, chocolate, vanilla, and even chocolate.

Angela GelsoIn Through The Oat Door
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Fit For A Foodie

Give the gift of good food!

To find more of our favorite holiday staples, check out our round up of locally made wares in the Greene Grape 2018 Holiday Gift Guide!

It’s never the wrong time to buy gifts for friends and family, but with the holiday season in full swing, we’re all thinking of extra special treats and surprises to wow them. While you roll out a holiday feast, let us take the guesswork out of gifting with a collection of local and ethical goods sure to please even your pickiest relative, friend, or coworker.

Let’s start with cookies!

Holiday housewarming wouldn’t be complete without a tin of artisanal cookies. Unna Bakery may be in Manhattan, but they’re inspired by the traditional recipes of a Swedish grandmother. These ginger snaps and airy vanilla confections are great with afternoon coffee or tea and they come in a beautiful round tin box that’s perfect for storing odds and ends like buttons or loose change. Of course if you’d like to add to the cookie collection, we think that Fort Greene mainstay The Good Batch makes a pretty mean molasses cookie! Their holiday cookie pack includes an assortment of eight delicious cookies that are sure to pair nicely with a hot cocoa, eggnog, or Tom & Jerry.

And of course, speaking of local bakeries we would be remiss not to mention Hot Bread Kitchen!  Their sugar dusted German Stollen filled with nuts and dried fruits are lighter than fruitcake, but heartier than a panettone. This traditional treat can be served with mulled wine for dessert, and with coffee the next morning.

For savory food lover’s…

We recommend gifting practical gifts that boast something a little extra. Give a touch of sophistication to the cocktail lovers with Dashfire Bitters, four bold flavors to experiment with in an apothecary style bottle that look elegant long after Happy Hour is over. Mustard Co.’s Black Truffle Mustard will elevate any sandwich for the food connoisseur or mustard devotee. These truffles won’t break the bank!

This list wouldn’t be complete without a fancy box of chocolates.

Jon Good’s bon bons are exceptionally fantastic! These artistic candies are individually hand painted and filled with a delectable ganache that is out of this world. With flavors like bananas foster, fig, and bacon, these sweet molded chocolates are also inspired by the galaxy. Of course if, you’d prefer to stay on this planet, Bee Seasonal’s single origin mini honey jars are a celebration of the local flora in Brazil! With honey varietals like such as pink pepper, quince, and acacia, these pure honeys contain wild flavor profiles that are sure to inspire cheese plates, yogurt pairings, toast toppings and more.

Better than a gift card.

Some of us are hopelessly difficult to shop for, which is when a gift card might be recommended although we’ve got something better! Our Whole Animal Gift Cards are essentially like the ultimate meat subscription! This card allows the recipient to eat their way through all the primals of an animal. It’s our butcher’s guide to a crash course in whole animal butchery!

Angela GelsoFit For A Foodie
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Raising a racket over this season’s squash!

The fall harvest is here, and we’ve got a few tricks and treats up our sleeves. This season’s bounty of squash may feel like a ‘been-there-done-that’ kind of thing, but just wait until you try our newest petite treat – the Honeynut Squash!

Honeynut is a fairly new variety of squash that’s been around just under a decade having been bred specifically for a sweeter more versatile taste than its cousin the Butternut, not to mention its loads easier to manage in the kitchen than a more traditional squash! So who do we have to thank for this small miracle? Chef Dan Barber, of Blue Hill and Blue Hill at Stone Barns fame, approached a group of breeders from Cornell University with the challenge to make a squash that tasted better and didn’t require a machete in the kitchen, and so the journey to make this little delight a reality got put into motion.

Honeynuts are popping up in a lot of local grocers’ and farmers’ markets where sellers boast its smooth texture and sweet yet nutty flavor, but it’s not just the taste that’s getting people’s attention. The little squash doesn’t have to be peeled, which is a huge time saver. They also have 3x the amount of beta-carotene as well as being a great source of vitamin A, making them easy on the eyes.

Afraid of being left out because you don’t have a raging sweet tooth? Fear not ! We’ve got one more trick up our sleeve. Introducing the Kabocha squash, sometimes referred to as a Japanese pumpkin. This winter squash is still sweeter than a Butternut but less so than a Honeynut, lauded for its velvety texture and high in both fiber and beta-carotene, use this winter veggie anywhere you would a pumpkin or traditional squash, that means seeds too!

Much like the Kabocha, Red Kuri squash is a hearty winter squash that you might need a heavy duty knife to carve up. Unlike its relatives, however, this particular squash has an exceptional nutty flavor making it perfect for soups and risotto. The Red Kuri can also be used as a decor as it plays well with gourds and pumpkins!
Of course we would be remiss not to mention the famed thin-skinned Delicata squash, not only is it easy to cut and roast, but the creamy flesh of this squash is ideal for roasting, no peeling necessary. Stuffing the delicata is also a popular way to serve up this variety, however between our three colorful varieties of Acorn squash picking the right veggie for stuffing can be quite a challenge. Try them all, and let us know what you think!

Our squash all come from Lancaster Farm Fresh Cooperative a non-profit all organic farmer’s cooperative of over 100 family farmers all working out of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, to ensure your produce is humanely raised and fresh as can be!

Angela GelsoRaising a racket over this season’s squash!
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Parent Teachers Conference

Notebooks? ✅ Backpack? ✅ Shaker & strainer? Wait, you thought we this was a back-to-school list for the kids? Whether you’re in grad students, teachers, or parents prepping children for a new school year, the start of back-to-school season often brings with it a return to the classic disciplines of reading, writing, arithmetic, and–of course–sipping.

The good news is that cocktails and cocktail ideas are practically dripping from the pages of so many of the world’s great books. But don’t take our word for it. Pull up a chair and put on your glasses– here are a few of our favorite learned libations.

Reading | Rob Roy

This cocktail takes its name from the main character in Sir Walter Scott’s 1817 novel inspired by the life of Robert Roy MacGregor, a Scottish folk hero who lived figure who lived during the 17th century. Sir Walter, himself a Scot, is widely hailed as the world’s first popular novelist, making this cocktail the perfect accompaniment for any literary page turner.

Combine the Scotch, vermouth, and bitters in a shaker or mixing glass. Stir to combine and strain the mixture into a chilled coupe or highball glass, then garnish with the cherry.

Writing | Hemingway Daiquiri

If there was ever a writer with a connection to hooch, it’s Ernest Hemingway. In fact, Hemingway’s love of drinking inspired fellow writer Philip Greene to pen To Have and Have Another, a book about Hemingway’s tippling habits and the drinks that found their way into his writing. According to legend, this cocktail came about when “Papa,” as Hemingway was known in Havana, tried the classic Daiquiri at a local bar. “Not bad,” he quipped, and stated his preference for the drink with no sugar and twice as much rum. The rest, as they say, was history.

Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake well, then strain into a chilled coupe or cocktail glass. Garnish with a slice of lime.

‘Rithmetic | Einstein

Don’t let the numbers scare you. Math is all about ideas. Renown scientist – and mathematician – Albert Einstein knew that better than most. “Pure mathematics is, in its way, the poetry of logical ideas,” he wrote in a 1935 letter to The New York Times. “One seeks the most general ideas of operation which will bring together in simple, logical and unified form the largest possible circle of formal relationships.” Our take on this brilliant, flavorful cocktail, which was developed by bartender Jason Winters and first appeared in Food & Wine, does just that by exploring the unique way vodka, aged tequila, and citrus relate to one another, enticing the palate.

 

Add the tequila to a chilled coupe or martini glass. Rinse the glass with the tequila and discard. Next, add the vodka to a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake very well, then strain the mixture into the glass. Garnish with the orange and lemon twists. Eureka! (That’s math for “Cheers.”)

Angela GelsoParent Teachers Conference
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